Explore the many ways in which different types of food and drink have potential to influence epigenetic marks on DNA and, ultimately, health outcomes. Learn how broccoli may be able to epigenetically reduce cancer risk, how an assortment of herbs could boost health, and even the ways a high fat, low carb diet may be able to boost mental ability. This collection of cutting-edge nutriepigenetic research studies aims to break down complex dietary epigenetic findings and understand its potential application in our daily life.

Check out our comprehensive e-book Epigenetics in Life: What We Eat to learn more about how different foods influence health.

Early Epigenetic Nutrition ‘Memory’ Could Program You for Obesity Later in Life

April 24, 2018 Bailey Kirkpatrick

For decades, we’ve known how important it is to receive proper nutrition during early stages of life. Nutritional experiences in the beginning of development can set the stage for many things, including body weight, and can even affect the risk of obesity as we get older. Recent research supports the idea that poor nutrition at the beginning of pregnancy or while a baby is nursing can be stored as molecular epigenetic “memory” on the child’s genome, potentially setting them up [more…]

A Western Diet May Adjust Epigenetic Marks on Children’s DNA and Damage The Nervous System

March 22, 2018 Estephany Ferrufino

A recent study has shown that following a western diet even before your child is born may lead to dysfunction of his or her autonomic nervous system via epigenetic changes. A western diet is high in saturated fats, red meats, and empty carbohydrates while being low in fresh fruit and vegetables, whole grains, seafood and poultry. Eating this way has been linked to many diseases, including hypertension, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity. Now, research suggests epigenetics may be involved in [more…]

Paternal Environmental and Lifestyle Factors Influence Epigenetic Inheritance

February 28, 2018 Estephany Ferrufino

There is strong evidence that suggests certain environmental or lifestyle factors may lead to increased risk of developing chronic diseases. These factors such as diet, behavior, stress, exposure to pollutants, and physical activity have been known to cause epigenetic changes which may be passed down from one generation to the next. It is believed that a father’s exposure to environmental factors can play a role in an offspring’s epigenetic patterns and health. Recent evidence suggests that sperm epigenetic modifications can [more…]

Maybe She’s Born With it, Maybe it’s Epigenetics: 5 Tips for Beauty and Anti-Aging

February 20, 2018 Bailey Kirkpatrick

We might say a beautiful woman is born with her looks or that she was endowed with good genes. But what if some of her beauty comes from reversible marks on top of her genes? The epigenetic tags on her DNA might be contributing to her glowing skin, young complexion, and silken hair. Interestingly, there may even be ways in which simple lifestyle changes could adjust these epigenetic tags, modulating the expression of certain genes that promote beauty and health. [more…]

Natural Compounds in Grapes Could Lead Us to An Epigenetic Treatment for Depression

February 6, 2018 Bailey Kirkpatrick

Recent research suggests that our diet and lifestyle can change the expression of our genes. This occurs by adjusting epigenetic marks on top of our DNA without actually making any changes to the underlying genetic sequence. For example, blueberries were found to epigenetically reduce DNA damage and drinking green tea may turn some genes on or off in women. In a new epigenetic study published in Nature Communications, researchers from Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have identified two [more…]

5 Ways You Might Epigenetically Boost Your Child’s Health Before Birth

January 29, 2018 WhatIsEpigenetics

When the Twin Towers came down in 2001, it was one of the most shocking moments in human history. This brazen act of terror traumatized an entire population. For those who lost friends, family, and acquaintances in the tragedy, it was an enormous cause of stress, grief and general departure from a normal state of being. Among the affected, many were pregnant women – some of whom developed PTSD after the incident. As reported in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology [more…]

Epigenetic Explanations For Why Cutting Sugar May Make You Feel Smarter

January 23, 2018 Caitlin Aamodt

The beginning of a new year is often a time for setting an intention to build new habits. A foundational goal many people share is to improve their health, which typically includes positive changes in diet. Although most would think of shedding pounds or building muscle as the primary outcome of these changes, it turns out that improvements in cognition are another big benefit to eating clean. To understand why, the key is to think in terms of evolutionary medicine. [more…]

Could the Mediterranean Diet During Pregnancy Epigenetically Reduce a Child’s Disease Risk?

November 28, 2017 Estephany Ferrufino

The Mediterranean diet has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Taking this a step further, research is now pointing to the epigenetic benefits abiding by a Mediterranean diet could have while pregnant. The main components of this healthy eating pattern might epigenetically protect the fetus from developing diseases later in life by adjusting what are called histone modifications. Inspired by the ancient communities like Greece, Spain, and Italy, this diet emphasizes [more…]

The Epigenetic Health Benefits of Blueberries

November 7, 2017 Bailey Kirkpatrick

Although blueberries are tiny, they’re more powerful than you might think. Touted for their high nutrient content – including fiber, vitamin C and K, and manganese – these little blue fruits may be able to adjust chemical marks on DNA and influence our health. Blueberries are incredibly high in antioxidants and it’s thought that this “superfood” can epigenetically reduce DNA damage, thereby protecting humans against aging and cancer. Examples of epigenetics in food include the ability of green tea to [more…]

Could Drinking Alcohol Epigenetically Hamper Your Ability to Process Cholesterol?

October 17, 2017 Bailey Kirkpatrick

Scientists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Johns Hopkins Medicine worked together to analyze human and mouse epigenomes and discovered that drinking alcohol could lead to epigenetic changes that influence a particular gene’s ability to regulate cholesterol. The results suggest an underlying epigenetic mechanism known as DNA methylation could explain why someone’s body processes cholesterol differently depending on their drinking habits. It also offers unique insight into the effects of cholesterol-lowering drugs which are commonly used to reduce [more…]

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