James Cain
About James Cain
James Cain has recently graduated from the University of Leeds with a Masters in Biology; his project focused on the epigenetic mark H3K4me3 and its role in regulating genes in the wonderful worm, C. elegans. He has been interested in epigenetic regulation ever since he was first taught its concepts during his undergraduate and is excited to see where the field goes in the future.

Neurotransmitter Serotonin is Welcomed as a Potentially New Epigenetic Mark

April 23, 2019 James Cain

The neurotransmitter serotonin (also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)) has an absolute vast array of functions across the human body. Most commonly known to regulate mood, it is also key for the development of neurones. In fact, serotonin is linked to various mental disorders, including depression, which globally affects more than 300 million people. It has long been assumed that serotonin has an indirect role in relation to epigenetic regulation1. The binding of serotonin to its receptor(s) causes a downstream cascade [more…]

A Fatty Diet May Affect Behavior Across Generations Through Epigenetic Mechanisms

December 26, 2018 James Cain

Having a high-fat diet (HFD) is not only linked to obesity but also to an increased risk of developing heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and certain mental health disorders. With obesity levels on the rise, it’s critical that we know more about how a HFD affects the body and find ways for early prevention. In recent years, there has been a growing area of interest into the behavioral consequences of a HFD and if these are passed onto subsequent generations [more…]

Toxins May Affect Epigenetics Through Multiple Generations

May 21, 2018 James Cain

Organic foods are rather popular in shopping baskets nowadays. After all, avoiding those pesky pesticides that are used on a vast amount of produce is surely good for our health. But what about the health of our children and their children thereafter? We already know that the life experiences of our mothers and fathers can influence the epigenetics in their children. Epigenetics may also be ‘remembered’ through the phenomena known as transgenerational inheritance; so the pesticides your great-granddad may have [more…]

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